Archives // Tutorials

I’m a self-taught photographer and filmmaker and I live in Birmingham in the UK. I taught myself everything I know about photography and filmmaking through trial and error, free online tutotials and an ongoing Photo a Day project. I began taking photos of my everyday life in March 2011 while studying for my PhD in northern Poland, and have continued ever since. I left academia after completing my PhD and now work as a photographer and filmmaker in the UK.

As I am self-taught, I like to give back to the community that gave me so much. I write photography and filmmaking tutorials for a range of abilities, from absolute beginner to the more advanced photographer and filmmaker.

Whether your goal is to learn how to take better photos of your family or holidays, to improve your photography skills as an artist or small creative business owner, or to learn something more specific (like how to make your photos look like film), I hope that my photography tutorials can be of help to you.



How to make your photos look bright and luminous

Monday 11th March 2019

Untitled

A couple of years into teaching myself photography, I began to wonder how other photographers made their photos so bright and luminous. I love luminous, light filled images but I just couldn’t seem to get my photos to pop with light the way other photographers did. I knew it wasn’t my camera. Browsing the camera pages on Flickr I could see that other photographers with the same camera as me could achieve the effect I so desired, but for me it remained illusive until I learned three pieces of technique. In this tutorial, I’m going to take the guess work out of it and share all I know about making your photos look bright, light filled and luminous.

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Understanding White Balance in Photography

Tuesday 5th March 2019

Untitled

In this photography tutorial I explain white balance as an introduction to a longer post I plan to write on colour theory. White balance is a key setting in photography, but it’s something that beginners often overlook. If you have ever found yourself looking through photographs you’ve taken indoors under artificial lighting or outside under street lighting and wondered why they’re so yellow and what you can do about it, then this tutorial will help you. This tutorial will also be useful if you’re an artist or Etsy seller who needs to photograph true to life images of artwork or products for your online portfolio, Instagram page or shop.

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Tutorials |

A Very Detailed Guide to the Exposure Triangle | Aperture

Monday 25th February 2019

Taken at F2 with a Helios 44 lens on an APSC camera // the image is in soft focus

In part 1 of this three part guide to the exposure triangle I explained what shutter speed is, how it can help you freeze or blur motion, and how to avoid blurry photos resulting from holding your camera in your hands. After playing around in shutter priority mode for a while, I hope that you have a better idea of how shutter speed shapes your images. In part 2, I’m now going to explain what aperture is in photography and how you can use it to photograph anything from portraits with beautifully soft backgrounds to detailed landscape photographs in the mountains.

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Tutorials |

A Very Detailed Guide to the Exposure Triangle | Shutter Speed

Tuesday 19th February 2019

In my first post in this series of photography tutorials for beginners I offered some practical tips to help you get started. Today I’m going to assume that you have been taking photos on full automatic mode for some time, and that you are interested in taking more control of your camera settings and exploring the semi-automatic and manual modes that your camera offers.

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Tutorials |

Practical Advice for Beginners in Photography

Monday 4th February 2019

Photography Tips for Beginners

This is the first in a new series of blog posts I am writing for beginners in photography sharing tips, techniques and practical advice that I hope will help you to learn how to take better photos. I first picked up a camera nearly eight years ago, and have taken at least one photo every single day since March 2011. I am completely self-taught, and I taught myself photography for free (minus the cost of my second-hand equipment). You can teach yourself photography too, and I’ll show you how.

In this first article, I share a few practical tips and ways of thinking about photography that have been really helpful for me and that I hope help you in the early days of your photography journey. Later in this series I plan to add articles about how you can improve your composition, how to master exposure and the exposure triangle, how to understand the difference between different focal lengths and how a longer or wider lens will change your image and much, much more.

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Tutorials |

How to make your photos look like medium format

Thursday 9th August 2018

Back in 2016 I wrote a post all about how to make your digital photos look like they were taken on film. Today I thought I would share another technique post on the subject of the film look, this time focusing on achieving the medium format look with a Four Thirds, APSC or Full Frame digital camera. This is a method I often find myself using, as I prefer the way longer lenses render photographic images. I sometimes use a 35mm or 28mm lens when I need to get a group shot or wide angle perspective when I’m working, but for my personal work I prefer to use the following method to retain the depth and feel of longer lenses in my wider perspective images. This technique is also really helpful when shooting in a tight space as it allows me to capture more of the scene without needing to reach for a wider lens to fit everything in.

How to make your photos look like medium format

The method I use to make my photos looks like they were taken with a medium format camera is nothing new, and I don’t claim to be the first to try it, however I have modified the method in a way that I think makes it much more accessible. More on that below.

I first came across this technique as used by wedding photographer Ryan Brenizer. It is often called the ‘Brenizer Method‘, but it can also be called the ‘Bokeh Panorama Method’. In short, it is the use of a long lens on a crop or full frame digital camera to produce stitched panorama images with a shallow depth of field. You shoot multiple frames, each with a small bit of overlap with the last so that special software can blend them together in post-production.

You’ll find lots of examples with very, very shallow depth of field, but it’s not a requirement. You don’t have to shoot at F1.2, F1.4 or F1.8 to use this method. I often shoot at F4 or F5.6 and use the method more for how it allows me to open up a composition without it becoming too flat. This method can also be used to make photos taken with an APSC or Micro Four Thirds camera look like they were taken on 35mm or ‘full frame’. There are no hard and fast rules, so just get out with your camera and get creative.

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Tutorials |

How to make your photos look like film

Thursday 3rd March 2016

Image | Żurawie via Flickr

In this post I show you how I make my digital images look like they were shot on modern 35mm film. It is one of my most popular blog posts and was most recently updated in May 2019.

In case you want the TL;DR version of events here’s how I do it, largely in camera:

ETTR to minimise digital noise and achieve the correct shadows exposure in camera; use vintage or legacy lenses; boost the luminance in the midtones in post-production; use film presets to mimic the colours of 35mm film stock. Remember though, the most important thing is your base file. No amount of post-production can turn a bad photo into a good one.

If you want to know more of the hows and whys, as well as my suggestions for good quality film emulation presets, read on.

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Tutorials |